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Once a Soldier is teaming up with Help.org to bring you resources for Veterans who are struggling with substance abuse. It’s a simple trap to fall into: substances that first help turn destructive and potentially fatal. Whether it’s doctor-prescribed meds, street drugs or legal drinking that can spin out of control, Veterans seem to suffer more. So do their families.

We receive many requests to post helpful information aimed at Veterans, and we are picky about who we partner with. Help.org, and their resource guide, both offer something that we feel has your best interests in mind.

With their permission, I am reposting their resource information here, and linking to their full page full of helpful resources here. From Help.org:

 

Updated September, 2019

In 2015, 1 in 15 veterans had a substance use disorder, and they are more likely than civilians to have substance abuse problems with alcohol, tobacco, and prescription drugs. According to a study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), around 3.7% of service members before the Vietnam war reported substance abuse, but recently, 12.7% of members who have served since 2001 reported drug abuse, more than tripling the pre-Vietnam rate.

While other segments of the population might turn to substance abuse for a variety of reasons, veterans often turn to substances like alcohol, tobacco, and prescription drugs when suffering from difficulties like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and homelessness.

The good news is that if you are a veteran who struggles with substance abuse, you can receive a variety of services for free from the VA including help detoxing, treatment in facilities, individual or group therapy, medications, and other services.

We compiled information to walk you through each step of the process – from learning about substance abuse treatment programs to accessing treatment. We also provide additional resources, hotlines, and funding programs to supplement or help make treatment possible.

Go to the source page for this article with lots more useful information.

ABOUT ONCE A SOLDIER

Our Veterans are killing themselves in record numbers mostly due to PTSD. An overmatched VA can’t take care of them or their families. We will.

Soldier suicide leaves Veteran families with thousands of dollars of bills unpaid, mostly bank loans.

We are the only nonprofit standing with the families after a veteran suicide. Stand with us.

Our Mission: Become the preferred channel for donors, advocates and volunteers who care about veteran families left behind after a soldier suicide.

Veteran Still Not Buried Needs Help Today

Michael G. Forsting

Chad M. Forsting, father of 4, committed suicide 10 months ago. He served in Afghanistan.
They are $600 away from what they need to finally put the veteran to rest.

Donate here.